Review: Fatty Fat Fat at the Vaults

Taking ownership of oneself is not always easy. Technologies, from surveillance to social media, have made the world smaller and if it’s not big companies selling our information, we are helping them do it – from posting a selfie on Instagram to searching on Google. For women, who have grown up with expectations of how to look and act, achieving ownership of one’s self, body, and mind, can be even more of a challenge. And that’s before we even talk about size.

Photo courtesy of Vault Festival (2019)

Photo courtesy of Vault Festival (2019)

Fatty Fat Fat is a funny and moving show about one woman’s life and struggles in a society that will just not let her live. From early childhood memories, comic sketches, and vivid poetry, Katie Greenall’s show balances humour, introspection, and the need for change. As celebrities and brands try to embrace body positivity (or more accurately, money), Fatty Fat Fat is a refreshing corrective – full of heart and yet devoid of bullshit.

I am sometimes cautious of shows that feature autobiography and reflection. While it is true that all performers bare a little of themselves on stage, I find the sharing of one’s personal life can make me feel uncomfortable. It is for this reason I do not always like attending comedy shows – the fear of cringing always puts me on edge.

Photo courtesy of Vault Festival (2019)

Photo courtesy of Vault Festival (2019)

I need not have worried. Katie is a superb performer and storyteller, whose gift of delivery, timing, and judgement gets laughs in all the right places. Crucially though, she never sugar-coats the pain that comes from growing up with a body that friends, family, and society deem unattractive and in need of changing. Her observations are playful but pointed, and gently invite audiences to consider their own prejudices, and those of others.

The energy is kept up throughout, as stories of school-trips, summer days, and discos are broken up with lively routines. Audience participation is a powerful and often underused dramatic tool, but is applied to great effect here with gameshows, readings, and Never Have I Ever. The last of these is a particular highlight, beginning with fun and jokes and ending somewhere far darker.

The set is minimal but effective, featuring one microphone, a fridge, and garish birthday balloons spelling out the word FAT. Katie’s use of these props and the space itself is to be commended, and under the direction of Madelaine Moore she is able to segue between the show’s many different moments with ease and skill.

Photo courtesy of Vault Festival (2019)

Photo courtesy of Vault Festival (2019)

My criticisms relate to pacing and structure. The show moves so quickly that I did not always have the time to fully appreciate every moment, and I thought that particular scenes could have benefitted from further development.

The sketches sometimes felt as though they were cut short, which was a shame, as they are highly enjoyable and engaging. I would also query some of the poetry, for while Katie’s language is indeed beautiful, it sometimes felt at odds with the otherwise frank and down-to-earth tone of the show.

Fatty Fat Fat is a brilliant and creative work, the result of a talented writer and performer with an abundance of fresh ideas. I am not in the least surprised that the show has now received Arts Council Funding, and I am looking forward to seeing how it grows and develops further.

Theatre is and should be a space for expression and affirmation, no matter who you are or what your body type. Hopefully with shows like Fatty Fat Fat, more people can take ownership.

Fatty Fat Fat is showing at the Vault Festival until Sunday 3 Feb. Tickets are available from the website.